Dog Pain Meds – Ibuprofen NSAIDS


A close up of a dog

If your dog is in any kind of pain or discomfort, it can be difficult to know what type of treatment to give them. This article will outline the differences between NSAIDs and steroids as well as provide guidance on when each type should be used.

If you suspect your dog is feeling any pain, it’s worthwhile to get them checked out by a vet just to be sure there isn’t some underlying problem. If the diagnosis comes back as nothing more than an upset stomach, then you may want to consider giving them something for their discomfort.

Ibuprofen and other Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs)

A person and a dog sitting in the water

Ibuprofen and other Non-Steroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs (NSAIDs) act in this way by reducing fever and inflammation while also relieving pain. They are commonly available over the counter at pharmacies, but should not be given without guidance from a vet (and even with guidance). The reason behind this is that pets process these medicines differently than humans do, and it’s quite easy to give them too much or not enough.

This is where steroids like Prednisone come in. They work by reducing inflammation caused by autoimmune disease or immune response problems. This helps with the pain even if it doesn’t stop the cause of the pain entirely, but they can be used as a “band-aid” measure until more effective treatments are found (such as immune system regulation).

But there is a problem

A close up of a dog

Unfortunately, because pets process these types of medications differently than we do, their dosage has to be carefully monitored and adjusted (and it may even need to be upped during times of high stress/pain). So while you might think that giving your dog ibuprofen for their upset stomach is okay, you could easily take too much and cause very serious side effects.

Steroids are usually given for their anti-inflammatory properties, but they can also be used in some cases to stop immune system responses or reduce autoimmune disorders. They won’t work for every dog, but if you’ve got a pup with joint problems caused by arthritis or hip dysplasia, steroids may help them feel better.

If your dog is in pain, whether due to the above issues or another reason entirely, it’s important that you get them checked out by a vet so that you know if they need treatment or not. Never give your dog ibuprofen without getting it prescribed first by a vet, as this can quickly become an overdose if their dosage isn’t regulated properly (and hence why it should only be given as directed by the vet). Steroids, on the other hand, can be a bit more tricky to administer and may need extra monitoring from your vet if they’ve got multiple symptoms or underlying problems.

As dog owners, it can be difficult to know what type of treatment to give our furry friends when they are in pain. The difference between NSAIDs and steroids is that the former act as an anti-inflammatory while the latter reduces underlying immune system responses or autoimmune disorders. If your pup has joint problems caused by arthritis or hip dysplasia, then you may want to consider giving them something for their discomfort with a steroid-like Prednisone. At the same time, if your dog simply has an upset stomach due to some other reason (such as eating too many bones), ibuprofen will help relieve inflammation but won’t address any underlying cause of pain. As always though, never give your pet ibuprofen without getting it through a vet first. Otherwise, you might accidentally give your dog an overdose of the medicine.

 

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